My Love/Hate Relationship with Essential Oils and My Favorite

My Love/Hate Relationship with Essential Oils and My Favorite post image

Essential oils can be used for many home remedies, personal care and cleaning products in place of pharmaceuticals and commercial products that contain toxic substances. However, since I am chemically sensitive, it is even a challenge to find the oils I can tolerate.

I absolutely hate lavender. I know it is one of the most commonly used and loved oils.

But even a mild sniff of lavender cuts through my sinuses and even when lavender is blended, I can still smell it a mile away.

When I first started with essential oils I ordered a kit with lots of different oils. I was very upset when I realized I could not tolerate more than half of them.

And even the ones I do tolerate, I don’t like having a fragrance around me all the time.

My All Time Favorite Essential Oil

I’ll tell you my favorite – it is ylang ylang (phonetically pronounced ee-lang ee-lang). I find the fragrance very mild, sweet and bright and it really impacts my outlook on the day.

I can take a sniff right from the bottle and immediately feel relaxation. I like to rub a drop on the bottom of my feet before bed and this works better (for me) than lavender for a good night’s sleep.

The essential oil of ylang-ylang is extracted by steam distillation of fresh flowers of the ylang-ylang tree, (Cananga Odorata). It is commonly found in the rain forests of Asian and South Pacific Islands such as, Indonesia, Philippines, Java, Sumatra, Comoro and Polynesia.

Ylang ylang has a slightly flora fragrance, which I find very bright and uplifting! When I smell ylang ylang, it brings me to a mountain top meadow of flowers on a warm sunny day.

Sounds corny, but the fragrance of an essential oil can have a very powerful effect on the mind and mood.

Health Benefits of Ylang Ylang

The main health benefits involve the nervous system, as it is an antidepressant, hypotensive, nervine and sedative substance.

This 2009 review of rodent studies show the anti-anxiety effects of essential oils.

Importantly, this 2011 review of human studies show a positive outcome using aromatherapy. The researchers concluded,

It is recommended that aromatherapy could be applied as a complementary therapy for people with anxiety symptoms. Further studies with better quality on methodology should be conducted to identify its clinical effects and the underlying biologic mechanisms.

Antidepressant – Ylang ylang helps with anxiety, depression, stress and sadness. As I explained above, the brightening effect it has on me can be extraordinary.

Hypotensive – Ylang ylang can help lower blood pressure. It is certainly something to try, perhaps along with other blood pressure lowering holistic approaches. It is well known that pharmaceuticals for lowering blood pressure can have strong adverse effects for some people.

Sedative – Ylang ylang has a sedative, relaxing and calming effect on anxiety and chronic stress. It can certainly be used during acute bouts of anxiety.

Nervine – Ylang ylang strengthens the nervous system and may even help repair any damage to the nerve tissue.

There are other benefits to ylang ylang, such as antiseborrhoeic, antiseptic, aphrodisiac effects, but I wanted to focus on the calming effect it has, because that is my own personal experience with it.

How To Use Ylang Ylang for Calming

  • Make an epsom salt bath using 1 cup of epsom salt or magnesium flakes in a standard tub letting it dissolve under the running water. And a few drops of Ylang Ylang for a totally relaxing experience.
  • Make a massage oil with it using coconut oil or some other carrier oil and massage into the shoulders or back.
  • Apply a drop into the feet over your regular foot cream for a better night sleep.
  • Put a tiny drop on your wrists for a constant scent.
  • Add to your diffuser.

Are you as Fascinated About Herbs and Essential Oils as I Am?

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Safety Considerations

The field of essential oils is an emerging field of natural remedies. That said, it’s important to note that there is virtually no research out there regarding how essential oils interact with drugs in human clinical trials. What this means is that no one really knows how essential oils will interact with medications or your specific body and health conditions.

Let common sense be your guide. Still, be sure to maintain proper dilutions, and general safety considerations still apply. As always, discontinue use if any adverse reactions occur and consult your physician immediately.

Please see my disclaimer here.

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Leave a Comment

  • Maureen May 18, 2017, 7:59 pm

    Let me try this again. Have you considered the possibility that you have developed salicylate sensitivity? You reminded me of me as I was reading this article. Ylang Ylang is about the only scent I can tolerate too as I’ve acquired MCS and don’t like most scents. Salicylates attack our nervous system, as most poisons do, and ylang ylang has a calming affect on the nervous system (as stated in the article). Since I quit sal foods my symptoms have subsided greatly, but I still have to remain vigilant until I get this built-up poison out of my kidneys and liver where it stores up. The biggest offenders are coconut oil, olive oil, herbs and spices, tea and coffee, nuts and berries, pasta sauce, peppers, wine and beer, corn and fruit, and non-root vegetables. But the bigger reason that we’re seeing an epidemic of salicysm today (chronic sal poisoning) is because it is a natural preservative (sodium benzoate, food colors, ascorbic acid to name a few), so its in 90% of our packaged foods, and alot of personal care products (Vits A, C,and E). Salicylates are aspirin, and this ends up it is in most pharmaceuticals and OTC drugs. Then of course there are the millions of people on an aspirin regimen! Symptoms are both physical and mental, and include hyperthermia, AFib, hearing loss, hyperventilation, weight gain, fatigue, mood disorders, anger, talking to much, fear, and insecurity. Most people who are sal sensitive also histamine intolerance (overfull) and amines, so do best avoiding aged and fermented foods. America is the land of Northern Europeans, and our genes don’t handle Mediterranean foods very well. This is why I teach The Northern European Ancestral Diet. This also has alot to do with the amino acids lysine and arginine.

    Here is my website all about the N.E.D. http://www.tendler5.wix.com/highlysinediet

    This is a great website about sals
    http://www.salicylatesensitivity.com

    Reply
    • Dr. Jill May 20, 2017, 10:13 am

      Hi Maureen,
      Thanks for all the info! I will certainly look into this! I’m glad you included The Northern European Ancestral Diet because I am of northern European descent!

      Reply