Why I Pulled a Root Canal Tooth and My Options To Replace It

Why I Pulled a Root Canal Tooth and My Options To Replace It post image

It was inevitable. I had a root canal in my first lower molar (#30) performed over 30 years ago. I’d say that is long enough to house dead tissue in my mouth. In the holistic dental community, housing a root canal is a danger to your health. Knowing that, I’m of two minds about it – sad to get a tooth pulled, yet glad to see it go.

Years ago, when I heard about the problems with root canal teeth, I thought about having mine pulled. But when I had to consider how to replace it, I decided that I would leave it alone until it failed.

Well, it has failed – the gum was receding and a cavity formed in the softer tissue of the exposed root. This led to decay under the crown. I did not for one minute think of trying to save it at this point.

Number 30, a first molar molar, is a major tooth and when it is gone it leaves a BIG space. For a while, I played with the idea of leaving it alone – not choosing any of the following options. But #30 is a major player in chewing and leaving a large space invites your other teeth to move out of alignment. Not good for your teeth or your gums.

The Extraction

I was nervous about the extraction. I had had one wisdom tooth extracted as a teenager but I do not remember anything about it. I elected to have this extraction done with local anesthetic. As it turned out, the tooth in question had short roots in addition to being a root canal tooth. I felt that it was already compromised and with the short roots would be an easy extraction.

And it was. I didn’t even know it was out when they told me it was done.

I asked the surgeon to clean the area so that no tissue was left inside. If the apical ligament is left, there is a possibility that a cavitation can occur. That is simply a space where bacteria can collect under the gum. You don’t want that. Hopefully, he took care of that for me.

As a practitioner I tend to instruct other practitioners on what I want done, even when I am not an expert in the field, but merely an informed consumer. I have trouble handing over the decisions to another doctor – sometimes that works in my favor and sometimes it does not. I try to inform myself of any possibilities, but researching is not the same as having clinical experience, which is why you have to choose a doctor that you trust and who is on the same page as you.

If you are a dental professional and I have misstated any procedures, please feel free to make corrections in the comments below.

The Options for Replacing a Pulled Tooth

According to the American Dental Association (ADA) there are three options:

  1. Implants
  2. Fixed Bridges
  3. Removable Partial Denture

These three options are probably what would be recommended from your typical dentist. However, there is actually a 4th option called a composite bridge that not all dentists know how to perform. According to the folks at Orawellness,

Dr. Ronald Carlson, a biological dentist in Hawaii, has a kit that he sells to dentists to educate them on what they need to build a composite bridge.  Called the Carlson Bridge ‘winged pontic’, this kit is something your local dentist could purchase for you upon your request. (source)

Finally, there is the 5th option and that is to do nothing. Just leave the space there. Most would argue that this is not a good option as the teeth can move and misalign and this could affect gum health as well.

If it is a front tooth you would not want to leave a gap for cosmetic reasons and if it is a molar you would not want to leave a gap for mechanical reasons.

The most important issue about leaving a gap is due to the risk of losing bone density at the site of the pulled tooth. If you do not chew and bite down on things in your mouth, your jaw bone is not stressed. When a bone is not stressed – that is, exercised – bone loss occurs. This issue informs us how critical it is to have a normal bite and having the ability to chew properly on both side of the mouth.

Option #1 – Dental Implants

Dental implants may be used to replace a single tooth, several teeth or even as a support for a full set of new dentures. This is a surgical procedure where a metal (usually titanium) post is implanted in the bone tissue of the jaw. This will support a crown that looks just like a natural tooth and is very strong.

The Procedure

While this may vary for each individual, generally the process involves:

  • Pulling the tooth – sometimes an implant is placed right after the tooth is pulled, but usually a healing period of 2 months is followed.
  • Placement of the implant – this is surgery so there will be swelling and discomfort after the procedure (and risk of infection).
  • Time to heal – during the healing process, the bone actually grows around the implant and holds it in place. This will be different for each individual and can take weeks or months.
  • Replacement of the tooth – this will be a crown (for one tooth or dentures for many) that fit perfectly on the implant. While the final crown (or denture) is being made a temporary crown will be placed on the post.

The Benefits of Implants

The teeth around the pulled tooth do not have to be involved. With a bridge, you have to involve the teeth around the pulled tooth – usually shaving them down to support either end of the bridge.

An implant looks like a natural tooth and they say, the implant can last for decades.

Additionally, an implant can help prevent bone loss when a tooth is missing. The implant will activate the jaw bone when chewing on that surface occurs.

The Downside of Implants

The material used in an implant is usually titanium, which is said to be accepted by the human body. From a holistic point of view, this may or may not be true for everyone. Just as they believed mercury amalgams were safe, so they say titanium is safe. It is still a metal and for those of us who have spent time and money getting their mercury amalgams removed, it would seen counterproductive to have yet another metal placed in the mouth.

Another option is zirconia as this is said to be relatively inert, however, on speaking with several dental professionals, I have heard that there is a rather large failure rate with zirconia (25%). It is also more expensive than titanium and requires an oral surgeon who knows how to use it.

For someone who is not in the best of health, particularly if you have diabetes, gum disease or other chronic diseases, implants of any material may not work well. Being a smoker will also affect your ability to heal.

According to Hal Huggins, (considered the father of holistic dentistry) there is an interaction between metal and the microbiota in the mouth. The metals tend to favor pathogenic bacteria which can give off  “atypical toxins”. (source) This can stress the immune system. If you are getting the implant to replace a root canal tooth, this may not be the best choice, especially if you have any health issues.

Find out more about issues with root canal teeth here.

The teeth sit on acupuncture points and the corresponding organ meridians may be disturbed when a root canal tooth has been left in the mouth. After all, a root canal tooth is actually dead tissue. Some professionals feel that it should not be in the mouth at all.

Additionally, there is the issue of jaw bone density. You must have enough bone density in the area of the implant. If you do not, then another procedure of bone grafting will be necessary. The options here are also rather daunting as the choices are either to use:

  1. Cadaver bone –  clearly this has its own ick factor and the potential to transmit unsavory microbes into your body.
  2. Synthetic bone – here again would be having yet another foreign material in your body with no telling how you are going to react to it.
  3. Bone taken from another area of you own body – this requires having another surgical site that would involve all the risk associated with any surgery like infection.

All that being said, there is something to be said for a procedure that may be just fine for most people, which permanently replaces a pulled tooth.

Option #2 – Fixed Bridge

This is a procedure that requires preparing the teeth around the pulled tooth. What this really means is that the teeth surrounding the pulled tooth are shaved down and will need to have a crown. Therefore, you are sacrificing two healthy teeth to replace one.

Additionally, if either of the two anchor teeth become compromised (and they already are when they are shaved down), you can potentially lose the original replacement tooth and the anchor tooth.

Furthermore, you are now asking two teeth to take on the chewing pressures of three teeth. When the two anchor teeth are already compromised, this may be an issue. Also, the replacement tooth is not attached to the gum or jaw bone and does not exercise the bone. When a bone is not exercised as it should be, the density diminishes.

The benefits of a Bridge

It will look and feel like a natural tooth and because it is fixed, you do not have to remove it for cleaning. It will also cost less than implants.

The Downside of a Bridge

As I mentioned above, you are sacrificing two healthy teeth to replace one. In my mind this is not a good option. There is also the issue of being able to clean properly under the crown that covers the pulled tooth (called the pontic).

Option #3 – Removable Partial Dentures

This is an appliance that has replacement teeth fixed to a plastic base. The base matches the color of your gums and it may also be mounted on metal. There is also a clasp that attaches to your natural teeth. These should be removed at night and cleaned. It may take some time to get used to how they feel in your mouth. There may also be issues with aging – the fit may change and over time a tooth may crack or chip.

Benefits of Removable Partial Denture

They are usually less costly than other options and may be easier to repair.

Downside of Removable Partial Denture

Clearly it involves more maintenance and thought than other options. There are also problems with how they fit and if anything changes in your mouth they may not fit anymore.

Here again, there will be metal as well as plastic in your mouth.

It may also be difficult to find a dentist who still does partial dentures at this point. Additionally, you would want someone who is  experienced and good at doing them.

#4 Composite Bridge

Thanks to the folks at Orawellness for information on this option. A composite bridge is made of the same composite material that dentists use to fill teeth.

The Benefits of Composite Bridge

In building a composite bridge, the two adjoining teeth do not have to be ground down. This is a large benefit because if one of the anchoring teeth have an issue, you won’t lose all three teeth.

There are also no metals/microbiota issues here although the composite material may pose a problem for some.

The Downside of a Composite Bridge

The downside of a composite bridge is that again you are setting up two teeth to do the work of three and the problems with cleaning under the composite tooth.

It has also been said that composite bridges are not able to last as long as other options because the material itself is just not as strong.

My Decision

As of this writing I have not fully decided what to do. I am leaning towards an implant because it will preserve the jaw bone and I do not want to deal with removable dentures.

Now you read can about what I did and how I feel about it in this post, My Dental Implant Update

Have you been faced with similar dental problems? How have you dealt with them? Leave a comment and share your experience!

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Leave a Comment

  • adrienne July 16, 2015, 7:15 am

    So how long do you have to make the choice? And what are you doing in the meantime? I have a root canal – I think it is one more tooth forward than yours. Dealing w/ the same questions. Thanks!

    • Jill July 16, 2015, 1:20 pm

      Hi Adrienne,
      I have 2 months before the implant and for the tissue to heal. I think when it is a front tooth, they may do the implant the same day the tooth is pulled but I would guess that is on a case by case basis. I do nothing in the mean time but think about my options. Thankfully I was already told that I would not need a bone graft. I guess all that cod liver oil, vitamin D from the sun, calcium and vitamin K2 is working!

  • Denise Rachel July 16, 2015, 8:59 am

    I was diagnosed with cancer of the appendix on my sixtieth birthday. I had the root canals extracted (in Costa Rica by Prisma Dental Clinic). The dentists told me that these root canals had been infected since the day they were put in. I had implants, as my immune system is extremely healthy. BTW, my oncologist told me the cancer had growing in me for at least 12 years, and the root canals (Tufts University Dental School) were put in 15 years ago. Root canals are a huge problem. I ended up having a stroke caused by the eighteen hours I spent on the operating table having the cancer removed.

    • Jill July 16, 2015, 1:22 pm

      Hi Denise,
      Sorry to hear about all your trouble. Were the root canals on the meridian associated with the appendix I wonder? How are the implants working for you now?

  • Vic July 16, 2015, 9:32 am

    A couple of years ago I had to make a similar decision – only the first three options listed above were offered. I was not thrilled with any of them – so, a lower left molar was pulled and nothing replaced it. Friends and family members thought I was crazy for making this choice. Since the extraction, I am careful when I chew my food and avoid caramels and very dry and crunchy treats. Since then, I have wondered if the implants have improved in performance and if having to make a similar choice today, I would choose an implant.

    • Jill July 16, 2015, 1:23 pm

      Hi Vic,
      I think implants are more common these days. I suppose you could always put one in if you decide to do so.

  • Sarah Auzina July 16, 2015, 1:05 pm

    I just had a pre-molar extracted a week ago, and am facing a similar dilemma. Our dental insurance is less than ideal however, and implants and bridges are way out of reach. For now it’s a hole, eventually to be replaced with a bridge. I’m glad I opted out of the root canal after all the horror stories I’ve heard.

  • Debbie July 16, 2015, 2:45 pm

    This is so very interesting to me. I have been working with a functional medicine doctor for the past couple of years trying to figure out why my health took a turn for the worse 7 years ago. The result being autoimmune thyroiditis, Hashimotos. I was able to get my TPO’s down from over 800 to less than 300 by going on a restricted Paleo autoimmune diet for a few months. My aches and pains went away, all my gut problems vanished, my engergy came back, I can sleep through the night. I was back to my old self. Here’s where the teeth come in. Seven years ago I had three gum surgeries, two major, with skin grafting becuase of receding gums. Today, I am still eating Paleo. I feel good, but not great anymore. Some of my aches and pains have returned to a lesser degree. I am wondering if a side effect of these gum surgeries is causing me to have a very low white count, basically having a low-grade infection all the time, which is also keeping my thyroid from calming down further. I have goiter too, and I just went in for a biopsy due to a 1.3 cm nodule. What tests are available to check for mouth bacteria? My functional doc had me do a spit test, which showed nothing. A few months ago I was ill. The doctor put me on antibiotics and all the pains that had returned vanished again. Also, I did not have a bacterial problem when the testing results came back. The cold I had was viral, so the antibiotics wouldn’t have helped that anyway. I think my problems may be mouth related bacteria. I’d like to know your thoughts and of any testing that may help. Thanks.

    • Jill July 16, 2015, 9:10 pm

      Hi Debbie,
      Has anyone checked for SIBO? Since you responded to the antibiotics that would indicate that there is a bacterial issue somewhere. There is also microbial testing at 23andme but I’m not sure that would help.

    • Debbie July 16, 2015, 9:19 pm

      Thank you for the suggestions. I will follow up.

  • kim July 16, 2015, 5:11 pm

    I have two root canals, one is my front upper tooth (8) and a tooth one over (6). This has been such a dilemma for me, I’ve been having severe auto-immune issues, but I have no auto-immune disease. And now they are investigating abnormalities in the tissue of my right breast. I have had several people present me with information regarding root canals and my symptoms. As a natural healthcare advocate, I can no longer ignore this. I need to get the teeth and root canals extracted. I absolutely do not like my options for filling up the holes, due to their location, a bridge is not an option. So it’s a partial denture at the age of 40 or implants. Due to my auto-immune issues I do not feel that I should opt for the implants, but I dread having a partial denture for my front tooth. It’s such an unfortunate process, but I will be happy once they get these rotting teeth out of my body, I’m believing in improved health!

  • Lauren July 16, 2015, 6:29 pm

    I have been struggling with a similar decision for almost 2 years: I appear to have a (painless) infection in my jaw bone beneath a healthy tooth. 2 dentists, 2 oral surgeons and a maxillofacial surgeon have recommended extracting the tooth to get at the infection and then putting in an implant, but I just can’t get my head around sacrificing a healthy tooth – smack center front! – when they wouldn’t cut off my finger to cure my hand.
    Thanks for the run-down on options and the reminder about loading issues, and vitD status (mine’s low again).

    • Jill July 16, 2015, 9:07 pm

      I would continue to look around for a doctor who may be able to address the problem without the extraction – maybe someone who uses a laser or a holistic oral surgeon?

  • Erica July 16, 2015, 8:07 pm

    Don’t wait too long before you make a decision. I had a tooth pulled (14, top left 2nd molar) 6 years ago, along with a root canal on tooth 18. I had a temporary crown/filling on the root canal tooth, which broke away during the 4th or 5th year. Tooth 15 had nothing to touch below it, so it shifted forward to touch #19 (the dentist said this is pretty normal for the tooth to shift). As a result, I’m not a candidate for any of these options without a lot of figuring out. I guess I could remove the slanted tooth and go for 2 implants, though.

    • Jill July 16, 2015, 9:04 pm

      It is amazing that your temporary lasted that long! I have two months to heal and then the implant if that is what I decide to do.

      • Kerstin October 4, 2015, 8:05 am

        Just reading now – what did you end up doing? I have 3 root canals in my mouth – two of them have crowns because they are the teeth in the upper front (8 & 9) so they would really not do well with leaving a gap…


        • Jill October 4, 2015, 12:21 pm

          I’m planning on a zirconia implant.

          • Kerstin October 4, 2015, 7:17 pm

            Thanks, and good luck!

  • Emily July 22, 2015, 12:15 pm

    Please update with what you decide. I have to make the same decision. I got one of my root canal teeth extracted last month–however they say I need to wait 6 months for replacement. I don’t like any of the choices but I think I’m going with the Zirconia implant.

    I have one more root canal tooth but it’s a front one so I’m waiting to see how the process goes with this implant before I deal with that one. It took me a full month to recover from extraction.

  • Claudia July 24, 2015, 10:28 am

    Hello I was just having a noise as I have your grain free waffles recipe from the food renegade website and saw this.
    It sounds like you already know about the work based on western price, did you also know you can pull a healthy tooth out and replace it in another part of the mouth ? They can even take a wisdom tooth out and put it in the front they shape it to fit in perfectly with all the other teeth ! The BBC did a two part series The truth about your teeth you may still be able to watch it on BBCIPLAYER. I hope this helps :o)

  • JJ October 14, 2015, 2:56 pm

    I have only 19 teeth left and they are all crowns, some root canals, I have bridges and a partial. I get my blood tested existentially every 3 months and every time my inflammation is very very high. I am thinking about pulling the teeth and have dentures made. Is there a best product out there to have them made in? My mother took a drug to prevent miscarriage back in the 50’s and after research found it had adverse effect on the teeth along with other problems associated with the drug, I have always taken great care of my teeth but the enamel being soft I have no real teeth left. I feel that all my health problems have been associated with my teeth. Especially since I have aged, still young at 62. I guess I am just looking for guidance.

    • Jill October 19, 2015, 10:35 am

      Hi JJ,
      I suggest you do A LOT of research before pulling your teeth.

  • Cecily October 16, 2015, 9:58 pm

    I had a bridge put in, didn’t even know of some of the options you mentioned, and at the time could not afford an implant. I’ve been totally satisfied with it, it’s about 20 yrs old now. Before the bridge, I tried a partial plate, but it was a disaster. Every bite I tried to chew with it, it would fly out of my mouth.

  • Lesa December 22, 2015, 2:36 pm

    your story is the same as mine, I don’t know if age has anything to do with the gums & with all of this… but my RC was in for 25ys & it just got pulled 12/7/15 I am 49. I had infection do to the RC being done incorrectly and that caused bone loss…now my worry is when they pulled #30 there is a HUGE hole…is that my bone loss??? am I going to HAVE to have a graft? im so scared, I want an implant but I know I wont be able to afford it…..and do to the fact I have a HUGE hole can I even have one….?

    • Jill December 22, 2015, 4:40 pm

      #30 is one of the largest teeth in the mouth so it would leave a huge gap. Is that what you mean? There may even be a slight dip in the gum and that would still be Ok. You need to see an oral surgeon that does implants to find out if you are a candidate for an implant.

  • Sara January 12, 2016, 9:09 pm


    Have recently decided to have two root canals pulled. I actually still have the teeth with temporary fillings. I’ve been procrastinating getting the post and crown done because I just didn’t feel right about these dead teeth. I have been reading a lot about extracting and how most dentists don’t do them correctly. This concerns me. Since you have went through all of this what do you suggest? I have insurance but it’s only through my primary dentist. Any holistic type dentist would not be covered and it is hard to justify paying when I don’t have to. Would appreciate any advice.

  • Kerstin February 13, 2016, 6:22 pm

    Hi Jill!
    Just wondering how your implants have done now that you have (I think) had them for a while – are you happy with them?
    I am still trying to decide if I need to do something with mine at some point…

    Thanks, and hope you’re having a great weekend.

  • D Smith March 24, 2016, 9:59 pm

    I recently had my one root-canaled tooth removed and it was on a first molar. I feel SO much better having a rotten, bacteria-ridden tooth out of my mouth. It is good you have had yours removed too.
    However, I would have to disagree that a bridge or implant is needed to fill the space. Maybe if you have more than one tooth missing, but my second molar is strong and healthy and I continue to chew just fine on that side of my mouth. Besides, I was told the space will eventually close up mostly in a couple of years anyway. Why would I go spend thousands of dollars on a fake tooth that won’t feel normal in my mouth because it IS fake, instead of waiting for the natural course of action to fill the gap? I’ve also heard invisalign can help with the gap too. I am going to ask for a consultation with my dentist.
    God bless!

    • Jill March 26, 2016, 11:46 am

      Hi D Smith,
      It really depends on what tooth is pulled. Of course you would want to have a replacement tooth if it were a front tooth. I had my second molar pulled which is the largest tooth in the mouth and leaving a space that large is not a good idea. Teeth can and will move and may not move in the direction you want them to.

  • Lillian Schaeffer March 29, 2016, 6:27 pm

    This is some great information, and I appreciate your point that dental bridges will look and feel like a natural tooth, but cost less than implants. I’m going to have one of my teeth extracted because of decay, and I need to choose what I want to fill the gap with. The teeth surrounding the one I’m having removed are healthy, so I think a bridge would be a good, less expensive option for me. Thanks for the great post!

  • Katie April 25, 2016, 1:18 pm

    I am having Tooth #30 pulled next week because it is a root canal. I’ve had it for 13 years and have since learned of the dangers within. I am not planning to replace it with anything at this time and just see how it all goes. I don’t have the funds to do anything else right now but don’t want to delay in removing this. Thanks for this post. It was quite informative. Did you end up getting an implant?


    • Katie May 2, 2016, 7:09 pm

      Just had this tooth pulled a couple of hours ago! Very grateful! Now I pray for healing and wisdom on how to proceed. Looking forward to any update you may post. I hope your #30 spot is doing well. 🙂


  • Melissa May 2, 2016, 12:16 pm

    Hello I found this blog very good. I too am faced with an old root canal and the gum around had receded. I have been having to keep it very clean. The one thing that concerns me is reading they can cause major health problems. I am young with two children and I want to be here a long time. I have been having face numbness, hand numbness and headaches. I have decided to have it pulled and go from there. Any advice on what you did after would be great.

    • Jill May 2, 2016, 2:57 pm

      I’m planning on writing a followup post soon. Stay tuned!

      • Michael May 17, 2016, 10:49 am

        Thanks so much for sharing your information. I am currently facing a similar situation and am seeking the best options. I had a root canal done on a bottom front tooth about 35 years ago when I was 18 after an accident. I’m sensing something is just not right with this now and am seeking extraction with possibly zirconia implant replacement… I live very close to UNC Chapel Hill and have just left a message to explore options through their Faculty dental practice… I am very open to other experiences with this!
        Thanks! Michael

  • Johnny May 18, 2016, 10:46 am

    My root canal molar tooth broke and I pulled the roots out myself with a pair of pliers. I have to say I saved money and my mouth feels better already!

  • judy wilson July 5, 2016, 5:19 pm

    One of my teeth is severely damaged, so I also think that removing it would be a good option. I don’t know what options I have to replace it other than using a denture. Having this information about implants, bridges, and partial dentures will be good to know. I like the idea of having an implant since it would act as a real tooth while only having work done at the site where my tooth was extracted. That would be a good way to make sure that my other teeth aren’t affected after my tooth is extracted. Thanks for posting this!

  • Ben William July 19, 2016, 11:04 pm

    Hello Jill,
    It is really complicated situations . I understand your situations.
    I am not dental professional though i have chance to work beside dentists as administrative officer.
    According to me , Dental implants will be best solutions for long run. I understand , teeth implants is very expensive and long term procedures.
    Dental teeth implants can be your best solutions.
    Best Regards

    • Arran Smith August 9, 2016, 8:32 pm

      Ben William,
      I respect your opinion , though i am afraid that I am not agree with you.
      Dental implants is painful and expensive procedures. It should be last stage for any solutions when there are no alternative for teeth.
      I prepare to choose other alternative rather doing dental implants.
      Best Regards
      Arran Smith

  • Carrie S September 1, 2016, 4:49 am

    Well long story short and several thousands of dollars wasted , down the drain (could have bought a nice car instead)
    Because of failed root canaled bottom molars which now have an infection, did not even last me 5 years. I only found out about it because i am poor and on welfare right now just me no kids (and God Bless the state of California for adding dental to medi-cal for adults)
    Its ironic that the previous dentist i had do all the very expensive work along with a contracted endodontist no longer are part of the dental office because the dentist , he got sued by another patient (just before i even started any dental procedures there) and he ran back to the state of Indiana. Im only in my 30’s.
    I just want to state for the record in case anyone may be having any strange and mysterious medical issues or a serious of strange skin rashes, welts, which disappear just as quickly as they appeared, maybe even led up to a kidney infection (pylonephritis then after being treated for that seemed like all was great , but then random swelling keeps occurring around the inside of both ankle bones.
    Now i used to be a hardcore hypochondriac. Always fearing the worst based on a simple symptom and scaring myself to the brink of insanity after looking those symptoms up in a medical book (this was back in the 80’s and 90’s before the internet lol)
    I can assure you im no longer just a hypochondriac.
    Infection in failed root canal treated teeth is no joke. The consequences of this irresponsible treatment when it comes to the small but very real percentage of patients that will experience a medical hell of sorts, can never prove or really know for sure whos at fault and or why, it is IMPERATIVE to always trust your gut and do your homework and research on any recommended and mandatory dental procedures and treatments.
    There are so many dentists out there who know as well as do not really know what they are doing. A lot of them are out for the money and as long as they are getting it who cares what happens to you once you can no longer afford them and are not a patient of theirs anymore.

    It is up to us as individuals to look out for numero uno. Dont ever trust your life and health in any one medical doctor and or dentists hands.
    Keep moving forward. Dont retreat a failed root canaled tooth if like me its only been 5 years and it failed shortly after having it done.

  • Pranavi September 10, 2016, 2:04 pm

    Hi! I had a root canal done on the same tooth you had yours done on, and I went to the dentist today and they took an X-ray. From the results, it shows that there is infection/leakage under the tooth so now I have to get it extracted next Saturday 🙁 I’m 17 years old and I have no idea what would be most beneficial

    • Dr. Jill September 10, 2016, 4:13 pm

      Hi Pranavi,
      Sorry to hear you had to have it pulled at your age! I will be writing a followup to this post soon, so stay tuned!

  • Deb October 18, 2016, 12:46 pm

    Hi Jill, I have 3 root canal teeth that are all leaking bacteria into my body. Tooth # 29,30, and 31. I too have autoimmune issues and shortness of breath, (29 is on the lung meridian) I am going for complete removal. I am not sure about implants yet. They recommend bone grafting at the time of extraction. Did you do this? Or did you wait and heal first?

    • Dr. Jill October 18, 2016, 4:52 pm

      Hi Deb,
      I did not need bone grafting, but the dentist told me he did put a little bone there at the time of placing the implant. If you need a bone graft I think they do that and then they wait a few months before placing the implant.