8 Actions to Starting the New Year With Real Food

December 29, 2011 · 15 comments

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It’s easy to make a New Year’s Resolution and feel good about it. It’s a lot harder to actually follow through with that resolve and translate it into action. When changing eating habits there is a learning curve that has to be addressed. It takes some effort to change patterns of behavior around eating food, buying food and preparing food. You have to get over the hurdle of habit and think about doing things a new way. I can assure you that we all have faced those hurdles. I can say that once you get over it, it becomes much easier. But you have to make the effort to execute your plan!

Here are 8 specific actions to take to get you over the hurdle. You may not be able to do all of them, but even if you start with just one or two, you will be taking a giant leap towards better health.

  1. Replace all vegetable oils (including margarine) with healthy animal fats such as butter, ghee, lard and tallow from pastured animals. For vegetables oils use only coconut oil, organic extra virgin olive oil or sesame oil. (Learn the truth about fats here and here and cholesterol).
  2. Replace all refined white sugar with natural sweeteners such as raw honey, maple syrup, molasses, stevia, sucanat, rappadura (these last two are forms of unrefined cane sugar which contain minerals). Use sweeteners sparingly.
  3. Eat more truly nutrient dense foods such as pastured eggs, pastured beef, fish roe, and organ meats like liver.
  4. Learn how to prepare fermented foods and drinks like yogurt, kefir, sauerkraut, etc., in order to provide your body with beneficial bacteria. (Stay tuned for my upcoming Fermentation Challenge where you will learn how to make these foods as part of my New Year’s Resolutions).
  5. Learn how to prepare more healing foods such as bone broths. (Get some recipes for bone broth here).
  6. Learn how to make homemade condiments such as mayonnaise and salad dressing. Use high quality organic oils whenever you can.
  7. Remove all soy products from your diet unless they are fermented (like real fermented soy sauce or natto) and use sparingly.
  8. Eat salt. Use a good sea salt. Your adrenal glands will love you for it!
  9. Take your cod liver oil. Grandma was right.

Make a goal each month to incorporate at least one of the suggestions into a plan. It works better to tackle one new action at a time.

Where to buy high quality cooking oils.

Where to buy natural sweeteners.

Where to buy fermentation starter cultures.

Where to buy cultured vegetables.

Where to buy sea salt and other spices.

Where to buy coconut products.

Where to buy cod liver oil.

For more information about traditional diets and real food check out the Weston Price Foundation website.

Find a local chapter and get involved! Local chapters are great sources for local products and buying directly from a farmer.

Photo Credit

This post is shared at: Fresh Bites Friday, Freak Friday, Friday Food, Living Well Hop, Homestead Barnhop, Melt in Mouth Monday, Monday Mania, Real Food 101, Tuesday Tasty Tidbits, Hearth & Soul Hop, Tasty Tuesday Naptime, Tasty Tuesday, Tasty Tuesday 33, Traditional Tuesday, Real Food Wednesday, Sustainable Ways, Healthy 2Day, Healthy 2Day, Gluten free Wednesday, Gluten Free Wednesday, Whole Food Wednesday, Mommy Club, These Chicks Cooked, Full Plate Thursday, Pennywise Platter, Thriving on Thursday, Simple Lives Thursday

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{ 15 comments… read them below or add one }

1 June December 30, 2011 at 12:42 pm

Thank you for this inspiring post.  One of my new resolutions is to find the type of doctor who will support wellness, understand the value of complete blood tests for evaluation purposes and at least offer options for good health instead of statins or pain medications.  Out with the old and in with the new!!   

One of the new Integrative doctors I went to said Truvia was a good option to replace sugar but you did not mention it – Did you deliberately leave that out?   He also mentioned Stevia. 

Your fan - 
JUNE

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2 Jill December 30, 2011 at 3:16 pm

Hi June,
Stevia is the natural plant that Truvia comes from. Truvia is the creation of Cargill, a giant food corporation. Just that fact makes it suspect in my eyes. Here is a post from Mark Sisson, someone I trust:
http://www.marksdailyapple.com/the-truth-on-truvia/#axzz1i1vvIlTP

Here is a way to make it yourself from the real stevia leaf from Food Renegade:
http://www.foodrenegade.com/how-make-liquid-stevia-extract/

Hope this helps!

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3 Barbaraleslie16 December 30, 2011 at 5:46 pm

Thanks for all your healthy info that you share.. Happy New Year!

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4 Beyondthepeel December 30, 2011 at 6:13 pm

Hi Jill, Great suggestions. I like the idea of tackling one thing every month. It’s a practical way of incorporating them into the everyday. I really only have 9 to work on. Oh and liver maybe a little more often, like once a week instead of once a months. Two good places to start.

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5 Jill December 30, 2011 at 8:38 pm

Hi France,
I say one a month so that someone is not overwhelmed. Some thing take more effort than others — like adding fermented foods may take a bit of a learning curve so it is best to do one new thing at a time.

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6 Suzanne Hill December 30, 2011 at 8:36 pm

Great suggestions. I’m a work in progress. How do you feel about coconut sugar?

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7 Jill December 30, 2011 at 8:43 pm

Hi Suzanne,
Coconut sugar is made from the sap of the flower. It is supposed to be lower on the glycemic index. I would say it is better than refined cane sugar. Probably OK unless you are on the SCD or GAPS diets.

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8 Rachel January 2, 2012 at 9:24 am

Those are some great goals. We already do most of those, but there are several more we could work on. One of the easiest ( and my favorites) to us was to start eating real butter. We don’t have milk cows ourselves so we buy it from a local farmer. Fresh homeade creamy butter is fantastic. I may look into that cod liver oil….

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9 Christy January 2, 2012 at 8:24 pm

I love lists like this – it reminds me how far we have come and still how much we can change.

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10 April @ The 21st Century Housewife January 3, 2012 at 11:36 am

Thank you for sharing this very helpful and interesting post with the Hearth and Soul hop.

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11 Barb @ A Life in Balance January 4, 2012 at 12:24 pm

Amazing how 8 changes can make such a difference in the diet! I need to work on fermented foods this year. My kombucha making has been suffering recently. I may switch to water kefir. I love homemade mayo though we don’t go through a lot of it.

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12 Jill January 4, 2012 at 1:19 pm

Hi Barb,
I hope you join us in my 28 day Probiotic Food Challenge startin January 9!

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13 Christine January 6, 2012 at 4:52 pm

Thanks for sharing this interesting post.

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14 Miz Helen January 8, 2012 at 2:25 pm

These are sure great goals to work toward Jill. Hope you are having a great week end and thank you so much for sharing with Full Plate Thursday.
Come Back Soon!
Miz Helen

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15 AmandaLP May 8, 2012 at 11:06 am

Im just clicking back to this as I linked to it from my website. Except the sugar part of it, I have done all of these! My next phase is lowering sugar, and either sourdoughing my bread or cutting out wheat all together.

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